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Venous Stasis Wounds

Venous Stasis Wound Treatment Q&A

Venous stasis ulcers typically occur as a result of impaired blood flow or circulation in the leg veins. It can lead to significant consequences and disability. They may result in discomfort and edema and need medical attention. Venous stasis wounds happen when low-oxygen blood cannot return to the heart, causing pressure and harming skin tissues, eventually resulting in ulcers. It can be caused by hypertension, venous blockage, and venous reflux. Our specialized doctors offer appropriate treatments for managing venous stasis wounds and help patients reduce severe pain associated with their condition. For more information, contact us or book an appointment online. We have convenient locations to serve you.

Venous Stasis Wound Treatment Near Me in Las Vegas NV and Brooklyn NY,
Venous Stasis Wound Treatment Near Me in Las Vegas NV and Brooklyn NY,

Table of Contents:

What does a venous wound look like?
What causes venous stasis ulcers?
What are the stages of a venous ulcer?
How long do venous wounds take to heal?

What does a venous wound look like?


Venous wounds exhibit distinct characteristics that differentiate them from other types of sores. Initially, these wounds begin to form and are typically surrounded by a red ring, with a yellow tissue covering. Despite efforts to care for the wound, there may be minimal signs of healing over time, and the condition of the sore might worsen.

The skin surrounding the wound often displays discoloration in shades of red, purple, or brown, indicating the pooling of blood in that area. Additionally, the skin may appear shiny or dry in texture. Unlike cuts and scrapes that tend to develop regular oval or round scabs, venous ulcers have irregularly shaped borders that align with the pooled blood underneath the skin.

Sensations of itching and tingling may arise, progressing to localized pain both at the ulcer site and elsewhere in the leg. If an ulcer becomes infected, it can exhibit symptoms such as the presence of pus or a foul odor. Infected ulcers are often accompanied by red skin surrounding the wound, which feels warm to the touch.

What causes venous stasis ulcers?


Venous stasis ulcers typically occur as a result of impaired blood flow or circulation in the leg veins. While ulcers can develop on any part of the skin, they are most commonly found on the legs. Normally, when the skin is injured, the body’s healing process initiates to close the wound. However, ulcers may persist and fail to heal without proper treatment.

Venous ulcers primarily from around the ankles and are typically caused by damage to the valves inside the leg veins. These valves play a crucial role in regulating blood pressure within the veins, allowing it to decrease during walking. If the blood pressure fails to decrease as you walk, a condition known as sustained venous hypertension occurs. This increased blood pressure contributes to the formation of ulcers in the ankles.

Underlying factors that impede wound healing or damage the skin contribute to the development of venous stasis ulcers. These factors include venous hypertension, where blood pressure fails to decrease in the legs during walking, leading to ulcer formation.

Venous insufficiency occurs when the leg veins are unable to efficiently pump blood back to the heart, resulting in blood pooling, skin damage, and impaired healing. Valvular dysfunction in the leg veins, known as varicose veins, can also lead to blood pooling and the formation of ulcers. Additionally, blood clots obstructing the veins reduce blood supply to the lower leg, hindering the healing process.

Poor circulation due to peripheral artery disease slows down healing, and conditions like diabetes, kidney failure, or inflammatory diseases can impede healing and cause swelling. Certain medications that suppress the immune system or cause swelling can make it challenging for ulcers to heal. Infections can further impede healing and spread to the bloodstream, while obesity, by exerting pressure on leg veins, prolongs the time it takes for ulcers to heal.

What are the stages of a venous ulcer?


The stages of a venous ulcer are characterized by progressive changes in the appearance and severity of the wound.

In Stage 1, the early stage of a venous ulcer, the skin appears red and inflamed, often resembling a bug bite, bruise, or mild irritation. It may go unnoticed as the symptoms are subtle.

As the ulcer advances to Stage 2, the inflamed skin may start to leak a small amount of fluid. The ulcer becomes more noticeable at this stage, resembling a severe bruise or exhibiting redness, dryness, or cracking in the affected area.

Stage 3 marks a significant progression, where the affected skin area begins to deteriorate and die. The ulcer becomes more pronounced, appearing inflamed and potentially deeper than in previous stages. In some cases, venous ulcers may exhibit a cycle of partial healing followed by reopening.

In Stage 4, the open wound becomes visible. At this stage, the ulcer is unable to heal on its own and requires meticulous cleanliness, it is essential to inform your doctor about the wound and seek guidance on proper care.

How long do venous wounds take to heal?


The healing time for venous leg ulcers can vary depending on several factors. With proper treatment by a healthcare specialist, the majority of venous ulcers can heal within 3 to 4 months. However, it’s important to note that some ulcers may require a longer healing period, and in rare cases, ulcers may not heal at all. The typical treatment approach for venous ulcers involves thorough cleaning and dressing of the wound. Additionally, compression therapy is employed to enhance blood flow in the legs, typically utilizing bandages or stockings.

Venous stasis wound treatment is available at Diabetes & Wound Specialists Affiliate locations. For more information, contact us or book an appointment online. We have convenient locations in Las Vegas NV, & Brooklyn NY. We serve patients from Las Vegas NV, Brooklyn NY, Spring Valley NV, Paradise NV, Manhattan NY, Jamaica NY, Summerlin NV, Henderson NV, Bay Ridge NY, Fort Hamilton NY, and surrounding areas.


Convenient Locations to Serve You

Brooklyn (74th Street)

Spectra Health (Las Vegas)

  • 5495 S. Rainbow Blvd, #200A Las Vegas, NV 89118
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Convenient Locations to Serve You