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Diabetic Foot Wounds

Diabetic Foot Wound Treatment in Las Vegas, NV & Brooklyn, NY

Diabetic foot wounds are sores or ulcers that develop on the feet of individuals with diabetes, usually as a result of nerve damage and poor circulation. It frequently causes foot issues when the nerves and blood vessels in the feet are damaged by high blood pressure, which results in discomfort, tingling, numbness, and loss of feeling. Dr. Salvatore C. Guadino, D.P.M. offers treatment for a chronic wound that frequently develops on the feet and legs of diabetic patients. Diabetes affects wound healing as less oxygen can reach the wound and the tissues fail to heal as rapidly as they should. Patients are less sensitive to pain due to the destruction of nerves caused by high blood sugar. For more information, contact us or book an appointment online. We have convenient locations to serve you.

Diabetic Foot Wound Treatment Near Me in Las Vegas NV & Brooklyn NY
Diabetic Foot Wound Treatment Near Me in Las Vegas NV & Brooklyn NY

Table of Contents:

What is a diabetic foot wound called?
What are the stages of diabetic foot wounds?
How do you treat an open diabetic foot wound?
How long does a diabetic wound take to heal?

What is a diabetic foot wound called?


Diabetic foot wounds, also known as foot ulcers or sores, manifest on the feet of individuals with diabetes as a result of nerve damage and impaired blood circulation. These wounds arise due to the detrimental effects of diabetes on blood vessels and nerves, leading to reduced sensation and delayed healing.

Around 15% of people with diabetes face an elevated risk of developing foot wounds. Diabetic foot wounds can vary in severity, ranging from minor blisters or cuts to deep, infected ulcers that necessitate immediate medical intervention. Typically, these wounds are localized on the bottom of the foot.

Effective treatment for such wounds entails wound care, infection management, pressure relief, and, in severe cases, surgical procedures or amputation. Regular check-ups with healthcare professionals are crucial for assessing the risk of foot ulcers associated with diabetes. If any signs or symptoms of infection are observed, such as redness, increased warmth, swelling, excessive drainage, pus, odor, fever, chills, heightened pain, or increased firmness around the wound, it is essential to promptly contact your healthcare provider.

What are the stages of diabetic foot wounds?


Diabetic foot wounds are classified into stages that indicate their severity and progression.
In Stage 1, the foot appears normal, and emphasis is placed on proper foot care and wearing well-fitting footwear.

In Stage 2, there is a higher risk of foot ulcers due to nerve damage and impaired blood flow. Callus removal through debridement may be necessary.

Stage 3 involves the presence of a foot ulcer, requiring pressure reduction and diligent wound care.

Progressing to Stage 4, the ulcer becomes infected, potentially necessitating hospitalization, wound culture, and surgical intervention.

Stage 5 is characterized by gangrene in the foot, requiring hospital admission, intravenous antibiotics, and possible surgery.

Finally, Stage 6 indicates the need for a foot amputation, with precautions taken against pressure ulcers during the healing process.

How do you treat an open diabetic foot wound?


The treatment of an open wound on a diabetic foot involves several key steps and considerations that will vary depending on each patient’s specific condition.

First, the wound is carefully cleaned and dressed to maintain a moist environment for healing. If there is an infection, appropriate antibiotics are prescribed. Pressure relief is essential, achieved through offloading the foot and minimizing weight-bearing. Debridement, the removal of unhealthy tissue, may be necessary. Blood sugar control is crucial for optimal healing. Additional therapies such as growth factors or diabetes wound treatments may be used. Regular monitoring and follow-up appointments are important to track progress and adjust the treatment plan.

In most cases, noninfected foot ulcers can be treated without resorting to surgery. However, if conservative measures prove ineffective, surgical intervention may be necessary. Surgical management options aim to relieve pressure on the affected area and can involve procedures such as bone shaving or excision and the correction of deformities like hammertoes, bunions, or bony prominences. You should also explore the use of skin substitutes (patches).

How long does a diabetic wound take to heal?


The healing time of a diabetic wound varies and is influenced by several factors. These factors include the size and location of the wound, the amount of pressure exerted on the wound due to walking or standing, the presence of swelling, the quality of circulation, blood glucose levels, the effectiveness of wound care, and the type of treatment applied to the wound.

As a result, the healing process can range from a matter of weeks to several months, depending on the individual circumstances. When wounds fail to heal within a month, they are classified as chronic wounds. Although some chronic wounds may eventually heal without intervention, seeking medical assistance is advisable to determine the underlying reasons for the lack of healing and to receive appropriate treatment. Ask one of our Medical Providers if skin substitutes (patches) will work for you.

Diabetic foot wound treatment is available at Diabetes & Wound Specialists Affiliate locations. For more information, contact us or book an appointment online. We have convenient locations to serve you. We serve patients from Las Vegas NV, Brooklyn NY, Spring Valley NV, Paradise NV, Manhattan NY, Jamaica NY, Summerlin NV, Henderson NV, Bay Ridge NY, Fort Hamilton NY, and surrounding areas.


Convenient Locations to Serve You

Brooklyn (74th Street)

Spectra Health (Las Vegas)

  • 5495 S. Rainbow Blvd, #200A Las Vegas, NV 89118
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Convenient Locations to Serve You